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Danielle M. PawlikowskiProfessor PatonAMH 101026 January 2018 The Coercive Acts, otherwise known as Intolerable Acts, were a series of laws from King George III that would keep the colonist of Massachusetts in order after the Boston Tea Party. Of course this produced frustration within the colonists from these Coercive Acts. Colonists’ anger at these situations are what fueled the American Revolution! This also began the first group of Continental Congress; the people that planned the steps to cease America’s relationship with Great Britain. These specific acts did not justify the British Parliament’s pride because there could have been more objective repercussions made in place for each individual Coercive Act. However, thanks to all of what happened, current governments can learn from the past mistakes. By taking apart each specific Act and looking at the effects it have/ what it could have had, one can only see how they did not justify Great Britain. In my opinion, The Coercive Acts did not justify anything. To be honest, the Acts made the British Parliament seem like an immature government rather than a strong one. The first one was the Boston Port Act, which closed the port of Boston until the British East India Company repaid for the spoiled tea and damaged goods. Even though the Boston Tea Party occured in the Boston Port, it doesn’t mean close down the operation. All this did was hold productions within the economy. The mature move would have been to stop all correlations with that company; maybe even shut them down. The British were wealthy enough to make their own tea leaves and spices. By making their own the Boston Port would have shut down itself. This would have affected the people a part of the revolt that ruined the trade, and they would have eventually regretted it- since many items they received overseas now never would come again. Not to mention that all of the tea bags would have polluted the water; joke’s on the colonists- they now have a Port full of sick fish and dark-polluted water. The second Act was the Massachusetts Government Act that replaced the government in Massachusetts with officials directly appointed from Great Britain. Now, I do understand that this is major payback from Britain. Yet this is kind of like punishing a child by having big brother or big sister watch them while mom and dad go out. Once again, a childish move on Britain’s part. The more intelligent thing to have done would have probably been to make Massachusetts independent from Britain- then go to war with them. Of course, this would speed up the process of the American Revolution, but in this case there were twelve other colonies that were on Britain’s side at the time. If this were the case, that particular colony would have been stripped of everything essential from their homeland: clothing, furniture, tools, silver, books, some foodstuffs, leather materials, sugar, molasses, weapons and slaves. Without these they would have been helpless in any war fired at them, and they would have realized their mistake in picking a fight with the British Government. Don’t you think? The third Coercive Act was the Administration of Justice Act. This act stated that accused royal officials in Massachusetts were to be trialed by a court in Great Britain- thus getting an easier sentence. This could not have made the British Government’s name look more prideless and insecure than it did. Why insecure? In my opinion, a strong Government should recognize their power, and this approach made them seem like they were scared of a wavering strength within themselves. The Administration of Justice Act could also be researched as the Murder Act- since it basically let any Government Official get away with anything that they did to the colonists of Massachusetts. King George III could have sent in more officials instead, and this would have solved any disputes started by the colonists. Of course, it isn’t right to have the people of your expanding country fear you, but out of control people sometimes need to feel the authority rise above the control radar. Some colonists might have even been saved since fear is a natural self-defense mechanism all humans possess! Fear is a good thing sometimes, just not the insecure way that this Act perceived it to be. Lastly, The Quartering Act. This stated that colonist- by law- had to house British soldiers and provide them with food. This Act was just an Act that didn’t need to happen. In my opinion, it is what made the colonists dislike the British; what mainly fueled the American Revolution. The soldiers would intrude houses, rob the people of their space, food, leaving them with dirt and property damage. This act influenced today’s government to see how pushing “the people” and their personal limits would work against you. It even sets a standard for the phrase, “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” In short, this may not have been a great revenge plan, but it sure did teach society a lesson or two! The Coercive Acts were a series of laws from King George III that would keep the colonist of Massachusetts in order after the Boston Tea Party. Of course this produced frustration within the colonists from these Coercive Acts. As one can see now, these Intolerable Acts did not justify the British Parliament’s pride in the least. There could have been more objective repercussions made in place for each individual Coercive Act. However, thanks to all of what happened, current governments can learn from the past mistakes. By depicting each Coercive Act and looking at the effects it have/ what it could have had, one can only see how they did not justify Great Britain.

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